↠´ Κύκλωψ ↠´ Download by ↠´ Euripides Historically relevant since it is the only surviving satirical play from ancient Greece, satirical as in related to satyrs and Dionysus not to be confused with satires , Kykl ps retains a certain charm to modern readers despite not being particularly outstanding It differs from our usual conception of Greek theatre, that of tragedies and catharsis and larger than life doomed heroes In Kykl ps we get our hero, Ulysses, and a climatic confrontation between him and the titular Cyclops, but they are presented in an entirely different way the atmosphere is light hearted, there are hints of comedy the Satyrs Choir and overall the structure of the work is much loose and playful It reads as an ode to wine than as a mythical scene That unique form makes Kykl ps stand out among the Greek plays, even if it s not brilliant per se.
Based on the conviction that only translators who write poetry themselves can properly re create the celebrated and timeless tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, the Greek Tragedy in New Translations series offers new translations that go beyond the literal meaning of the Greek in order to evoke the poetry of the originals Under the general editorship of Peter Burian and Alan Shapiro, each volume includes a critical introduction, commentary on the text, full stage directions, and a glossary of the mythical and geographical references in the play Brimming with lusty comedy and horror, this new version of Euripides only extant satyr play has been refreshed with all the salty humor, vigorous music, and dramatic shapeliness available in modern American English Driven by storms onto the shores of the Cyclops island, Odysseus and his men find that the Cyclops has already enslaved a company of Greeks When some of Odysseus crew are seized and eaten by the Cyclops, Odysseus resorts to spectacular stratagems to free his crew and escape the island In this powerful work, prize winning poet Heather McHugh and respected classicist David Konstan combine their talents to create this unusually strong and contemporary tragic comedy marked by lively lyricism and moral subtlety.
Man, I never knew Greek plays could be this funny Taking the myth of Odysseus and Cyclops Polyphemus, Euripides has made it into a humorous play of drunkards And credit to the translator for making the language so contemporary it felt like I am hearing a bunch of drunk teenagers arguing A must read for Greek drama geeks.
The sole complete and extant satyr play, read in the translation of William Arrowsmith.
Historically relevant since it is the only surviving satirical play from ancient Greece, satirical as in related to satyrs and Dionysus not to be confused with satires , Kykl ps retains a certain charm to modern readers despite not being particularly outstanding It differs from our usual conception of Greek theatre, that of tragedies and catharsis and larger than life doomed heroes In Kykl ps we get our hero, Ulysses, and a climatic confrontation between him and the titular Cyclops, but they are presented in an entirely different way the atmosphere is light hearted, there are hints of comedy the Satyrs Choir and overall the structure of the work is much loose and playful It reads as an ode to wine than as a mythical scene That unique form makes Kykl ps stand out among the Greek plays, even if it s not brilliant per se.
The main story is Odysseus and his men come to an unknown land, we re talking really uncivilised, Odysseus observes that no food is grown and wonders what kind of people would live here After meeting a group of Satyrs and their father, Selenus, he meets the host and finds out The host is Cyclops, Odysseus learns quickly how he applies the hospitality rules and has guests for dinner.
This play could be read as a comedy but really in strict Greek drama terms it is a satyr, the one that exists in its complete form At times it s bawdy but not as brash as movies like American Pie, as it does not lose its bearings from being a tragedy but it s a tragedy with wit.
Based on the ninth book of The Odyssey, this loosely follows the same story, Odysseus makes his escape after telling Cyclops he is called no name and injures him after he gets him drunk on wine The first one of the two big differences between Homer and tale of Cyclops are the action of Odysseus men happen off stage are reported by Odysseus The second difference is the satyrs and Selenus step in for other characters for Odysseus and Cyclops to exchange words with, this is done with comical affect.
This is the second book I ve read to help me understand Homer s The Odysseybetter Lang s Tales of Troy Ulysses, the sacker of cities was my first one Until now these concepts were alien to me, I ve been comprehending the hospitality rules and the importance of food in works by Homer through modern eyes So, reading this is a beginning for me to grasp this concept better This translation was by Heather McHugh, and included an intro and notes by David Konstan, explaining what satyr plays are and how they fit into the annual drama festival, also touching on the importance of it Also, it gave a comparison between Homer and Cyclops, and suggested how this play would have been staged All of which further added to my reading experience, where I walked away with a broader understanding than I was expecting.
But the biggest surprise for me was Euripides writes comedy Having only read his weighty dramas I had no idea he did this It was so neat to discover this.
The main story is Odysseus and his men come to an unknown land, we re talking really uncivilised, Odysseus observes that no food is grown and wonders what kind of people would live here After meeting a group of Satyrs and their father, Selenus, he meets the host and finds out The host is Cyclops, Odysseus learns quickly how he applies the hospitality rules and has guests for dinner.
This play could be read as a comedy but really in strict Greek drama terms it is a satyr, the one that exists in its complete form At times it s bawdy but not as brash as movies like American Pie, as it does not lose its bearings from being a tragedy but it s a tragedy with wit.
Based on the ninth book of The Odyssey, this loosely follows the same story, Odysseus makes his escape after telling Cyclops he is called no name and injures him after he gets him drunk on wine The first one of the two big differences between Homer and tale of Cyclops are the action of Odysseus men happen off stage are reported by Odysseus The second difference is the satyrs and Selenus step in for other characters for Odysseus and Cyclops to exchange words with, this is done with comical affect.
This is the second book I ve read to help me understand Homer s The Odysseybetter Lang s Tales of Troy Ulysses, the sacker of cities was my first one Until now these concepts were alien to me, I ve been comprehending the hospitality rules and the importance of food in works by Homer through modern eyes So, reading this is a beginning for me to grasp this concept better This translation was by Heather McHugh, and included an intro and notes by David Konstan, explaining what satyr plays are and how they fit into the annual drama festival, also touching on the importance of it Also, it gave a comparison between Homer and Cyclops, and suggested how this play would have been staged All of which further added to my reading experience, where I walked away with a broader understanding than I was expecting.
But the biggest surprise for me was Euripides writes comedy Having only read his weighty dramas I had no idea he did this It was so neat to discover this.
The Cyclops only claim to fame is that it s the world s only complete surviving Satyr play In Athenian drama festivals, each playwright submitted four plays a tragic trilogy and a concluding satyr play, which is a retelling of a classic myth with the addition of a bunch of dudes dressed as satyrs With boners Boners were an integral ingredient of the satyr play Euripides luckily saved satyr play is, as you may have guessed, a retelling of the famous episode from The Odyssey where Odysseus fools the Cyclops and gets half his crew eaten in the process.
It s fairly entertaining, I guess I mean, I think we can all agree that most stories would be improved by having a bunch of drunks prancing around in the background with their boners out, whether or not that has anything at all to do with the plot.
But it s not at all the best work Euripides did it all seems pretty tossed off It also includes, by the way, a rape joke that gathered some attention a while back Context Polyphemus the cyclops gets Silenus the satyr drunk and then rapes him Not because it s unusual Greek drama is chock full of rape, both jokey and not just because, I guess Here s a piece about it The author concludes,I decided that Euripides, like Amy Schumer, was punching up The Cyclops scene can be read as a trenchant joke digging into the intensely creepy origins of Athenian rape culture It subtly calls into question the ethics of a common custom in Athens the sexually inflected mentorship of adolescents by older men And the fact that the rape is preceded by a mock symposium goes even further, skewering the common sympotic custom of singing songs about desirable young boys.
In other words, Euripides rape joke works for me.
So anyway, a ten points for comparing Euripides to Amy Schumer, b trigger warning, and c let s just confirm that this is the official progenitor of this.
I ve been getting super sick of Paul Roche s translations, so I switched over to William Arrowsmith s for this one, and I liked it much better I even skimmed Roche s afterwards for comparison Arrowsmith wins, although Roche s having ten plays in the same volume is still a pretty big advantage.
A Drunken Retelling of the Cyclops Saga11 November 2018 Well, once again that large collection of books containing a bunch of the world s classical works has come in handy The reason being is that I don t seem to have another copy of this particular Euripidean play, so since I have been slowly making my way through all of the Greek plays and other works I haven t had to resort to scouring the internet to attempt to locate a copy, not that that would ve been too much of a problem Actually, it has come to my attention that Percey Shelly actually did a translation of the play, which somehow didn t surprise me in the least However, I wouldn t actually consider it to be what I would consider romantic Then again, the romance poets probably were interested in romance in the form of pertaining to Rome as opposed to romance in the form of Mills and Boon In fact I do wonder at times how it is that the likes of Mills and Boon took the name Romance, since when we use the word Romance in connection to languages, it isn t that we are suggesting that the language itself is sexy though some people would beg to differ but rather that it originated from Latin I seem to be drifting a bit here so I better get back on track I m surprised that this play didn t appear in one of the four Penguin volumes of Euripdes plays, particularly since there is something very, very unique about it it is the only extant copy of a satyr play that we have Satyr plays are basically plays that would be performed after a trilogy of tragedies, and tended to be a lot light hearted I guess that should be expected, because if you had just spent the entire day watching three films like, say, Apocalypse Now, you probably would want to finish the day off with something a lot less serious, say Dumb and Dumber Okay, I m not suggesting that the Cylops is anything like Dumb and Dumber, particularly since these plays probably wouldn t be all that suitable for children not that they actually had ratings back in the days of the Ancient Greeks The story itself is pretty straight forward, and would be familiar to those who know the Odyssey Yes, it is basically the story where Odysseus lands up on the island of the cyclops and has to use all his skills to be able to escape However, there is an added catch, a bunch of satyrs are here as well, and they have been bound by the cyclops to act as shepherds The thing with satyrs is that they are happy go lucky types of individuals who like wine, women, song, and basically the good old party atmosphere Needless to say these satyrs tend to also be pretty crude, you know the big phallus and all that, though this is not necessarily mentioned in the play, it is just that we are pretty well versed in what went on Greek plays, like Shakespeare s plays, didn t have the details stage instructions that many of the plays today have In a way, this is a rather light hearted play, though I wouldn t consider it to be one of those laugh out loud types of plays that Aristophanes would write However, there are parts that make us think, particularly the idea of law and order Of course the cyclops, whom we aren t supposed to sympathise with, you know with the killing and eating of Odysseus men and all that, argue that laws only exist to protect the weak from the strong Well, in a way that is true, expect for the fact that when the strong get into power they have this habit of watering down the laws for their benefit This happens all to often these days how many politicians are ever prosecuted for corruption, or corporate leaders ever prosecuted for financial fraud and environmental violations Yeah, while we do live in a civil and ordered society, it only ever seems that it is the street criminal that ends up in gaol, and when they end up in gaol it only works to push them further into the arms of the criminal underworld Then again, in that underworld there certainly is no law, and you will quickly find out that it is there that the strong certainly rule.
First of all if I can geek out for a second it was so refreshing to FINALLY read an ancient satyr play For years, I ve heard echoed again and again the symbolic value of Greek playwrights staging satyr plays bawdy farces that served as short satirical finales to tragic trilogies without having any concrete understanding of how said pieces played While the concept always fascinated me, the unfortunate dearth of extant satyr plays Cyclops is the ONLY one has left the style exiled from the theatrical canon After reading this, I can t help but ask why How else can fledgling theatre historians draw any tangible connection to the satyr play style if Cyclops our one link to this world is left off the required reading list Stepping down from my holy shit that s nerdy soapbox, Heather McHugh s translation of Cyclops was outstanding The contemporaneity of the translation was edgy enough to make the humor bite, without sacrificing the rich poetry to MTV era relevance This, matched with the play s natural irreverence drunken monsters, satyr s running around with erect dongs, etc would make this play an instant hit with a modern audience Also, I m willing to bet this show would sell to a modern crowd because the gulf between contemporary readers ignorance of ancient geopolitics and classical tragedies bevy of timely aka obscure references is MUCH slimmer in Cyclops than in most Greek tragedies Most people know about Odysseus, right Focusing on the titular character, I couldn t help but draw a connection between Euripides Cyclops and John Gardner s depiction of the Dragon in Grendel Both characters live in solitude, spurn such societal institutions as religion and government, and opt to satiate what they consider the only truly worthwhile god their appetite For each character, gluttony assumes a unique form Polyphemus feeds his belly while the Dragon hoards wealth However, in both cases, the author creates gobs of ironic humor by upending readers expectations of how such monsters would behave the reader comes to the text assuming the Cyclops and Dragon will act as brutish as their infamous reputations dictate, only to find the characters pontificating eloquently on such issues as law, religion, government, and human desire from the mouths of brutes While it s unsurprising that Euripides would write a killer funny satyr play considering the already tragicomic style of his tragedies , I wonder how Sophocles Aeschuylus pulled it off The latter two tragedians while wickedly skilled are famous for their hyper serious gravity Could they cut loose like Euripides Or was the humor in their satyr plays a bit neutered Might be worth tracking down the excerpts from their lost satyr plays to see how versatile they were.
This is comic version of the Odysseus Polyphemus story With a chorus of satyrs, you better believe there are plenty of dirty jokes to go around It s worth reading just to discover the unfortunate fate of the no good Silenus This short play s a bit ridiculous, but that s kind of the point, considering it was meant to send the audience home on a lighter note after sitting through three tragedies This makes me wish there were surviving Satyr plays.
The only extant Satyr play, Cyclops is unique It s hilarious I actually laughed out loud at the whining satyrs, the drunken Polyphemus and Silenus, the taunting songs of the chorus of Satyrs, the sexuality jokes Cyclops focuses around Bacchus sacred wine, with hilarious results Silenus, the old satyr, is drunk off his ass, making lewd jokes and fumbling around Polyphemus confesses his love The juxtaposition of men being eaten and raucous drunken revelry is effective, and Euripides obviously knew what he was doing Cyclops makes me wish than one Satyr play was extant Let s hope for a chance papyrus find.
A bizarre story which dirty jokes Odyseus lands on an island dominated by a mean and merciless cyclop named Polifemos, which reduces humans as food and slaves, and also disregards the gods He also misses the wine and ah yes, and he also chooses to drink from the fairy cup But such secret could not be revealed without the invocation of Dyonisius.
It is a retelling of the encounter with Polifemos in The Odyssey, in the form of a greek satire.
Man, I never knew Greek plays could be this funny Taking the myth of Odysseus and Cyclops Polyphemus, Euripides has made it into a humorous play of drunkards And credit to the translator for making the language so contemporary it felt like I am hearing a bunch of drunk teenagers arguing A must read for Greek drama geeks.