Þ Read Ò The Rosewood Casket by Sharyn McCrumb é A number of intriguing elements intertwined through this book The narrative lost focus about a third of the way through McCrumb probably could have made this a masterpiece if she had set it aside and went back to it later for serious editing and reworking It s really too bad she didn t.
I really liked this story I loved the feel of the book like I was sitting on the porch in a rocking chair watching the clouds in the sky, listening to an old southern grandmother tell the story It just had a really pleasant, easy going feeling But it wasn t just a pleasant, easy going book The story really moved along and I was never bored or tempted to skim I liked the flashbacks that interrupted the story for just a minute and told some of the backstory Instead of just being distracting, they were a complete story in their own right, a story I wanted to hear of And parts of the story were harsh and forced me to face the worst in humanity Some people didn t treat each other particularly well, which may have been a reflection of the hardness of life on the mountain Other people were truly likable I found myself rooting for them to survive and succeed.
I liked the ending a lot There was some sadness, but overall I think it was happily ever after I ll definitely be reading by Sharyn McCrumb and I m hoping to run into some of the characters from this book again.
In the Tennessee Appalachian Mountains in a made up county, a real estate developer wants to take land held by the Stargill and Stallard families for decades A comatose Randall Stargill is found by his neighbor after he doesn t see him for a couple days He sees the man s written wish to die at home rather than in a hospital The neighbor calls the man s family to make the decision They, of course, get him to the hospital in Johnson City Their father wanted the boys to build his casket from some rosewood stored in the barn.
Neighbor Nora Bonesteel brings a box she wishes to be buried with Randall When they open it, they call the sheriff because it is the bones of a young child The bones are dated, but the sheriff cannot get Nora to divulge where she obtained them.
The Stargill family is divided on the disposition of the estate Some want to sell others want to preserve the natural beauty of the area The Stallard family is not so fortunate They owe back taxes which they are unable to pay The developer forces the sheriff to post a tax sale notice Dovey Stallard appeals to Charles Martin Stargill, a well known country singer, to help her save their farm, but he s unable to do so since he spends most of it on his band, bus, and lifestyle.
Charles Martin brought his current female interest and her daughter along with him She s a curious little girl who wanders around the mountain just so she won t be in the way of the adults She loves to hear Clabe s Appalachian tales about Daniel Boone and Nancy Ward.
The novel includes a number of twists The novel is distinctly Appalachian in flavor Some of the twists took it in a direction I didn t expect, and I m sad about some results and happy about others.
I listened to the audio version of this I noted a couple of odd pronunciations which indicate the narrator was not familiar with the region, but her cadence fit the book.
Description Randall Stargill lies dying on his southern Appalachian farm, and his four sons have come home to build him a coffin from the cache of rosewood he has hoarded for the special purpose Meanwhile, mountain wisewoman Nora Bonesteel, Randall s sweetheart of long ago, prepares another box for his burial a small box containing human bonesA story containing angels Nice series this, what with the local folklore and indiosyncratic inhabitants.
3 She Walks These Hills Ballad, 3 3 The Rosewood Casket Ballad, 4 3 The Ballad of Frankie Silver Ballad, 5 A number of intriguing elements intertwined through this book The narrative lost focus about a third of the way through McCrumb probably could have made this a masterpiece if she had set it aside and went back to it later for serious editing and reworking It s really too bad she didn t.
I really liked this story I loved the feel of the book like I was sitting on the porch in a rocking chair watching the clouds in the sky, listening to an old southern grandmother tell the story It just had a really pleasant, easy going feeling But it wasn t just a pleasant, easy going book The story really moved along and I was never bored or tempted to skim I liked the flashbacks that interrupted the story for just a minute and told some of the backstory Instead of just being distracting, they were a complete story in their own right, a story I wanted to hear of And parts of the story were harsh and forced me to face the worst in humanity Some people didn t treat each other particularly well, which may have been a reflection of the hardness of life on the mountain Other people were truly likable I found myself rooting for them to survive and succeed.
I liked the ending a lot There was some sadness, but overall I think it was happily ever after I ll definitely be reading by Sharyn McCrumb and I m hoping to run into some of the characters from this book again.
In the Tennessee Appalachian Mountains in a made up county, a real estate developer wants to take land held by the Stargill and Stallard families for decades A comatose Randall Stargill is found by his neighbor after he doesn t see him for a couple days He sees the man s written wish to die at home rather than in a hospital The neighbor calls the man s family to make the decision They, of course, get him to the hospital in Johnson City Their father wanted the boys to build his casket from some rosewood stored in the barn.
Neighbor Nora Bonesteel brings a box she wishes to be buried with Randall When they open it, they call the sheriff because it is the bones of a young child The bones are dated, but the sheriff cannot get Nora to divulge where she obtained them.
The Stargill family is divided on the disposition of the estate Some want to sell others want to preserve the natural beauty of the area The Stallard family is not so fortunate They owe back taxes which they are unable to pay The developer forces the sheriff to post a tax sale notice Dovey Stallard appeals to Charles Martin Stargill, a well known country singer, to help her save their farm, but he s unable to do so since he spends most of it on his band, bus, and lifestyle.
Charles Martin brought his current female interest and her daughter along with him She s a curious little girl who wanders around the mountain just so she won t be in the way of the adults She loves to hear Clabe s Appalachian tales about Daniel Boone and Nancy Ward.
The novel includes a number of twists The novel is distinctly Appalachian in flavor Some of the twists took it in a direction I didn t expect, and I m sad about some results and happy about others.
I listened to the audio version of this I noted a couple of odd pronunciations which indicate the narrator was not familiar with the region, but her cadence fit the book.
Description Randall Stargill lies dying on his southern Appalachian farm, and his four sons have come home to build him a coffin from the cache of rosewood he has hoarded for the special purpose Meanwhile, mountain wisewoman Nora Bonesteel, Randall s sweetheart of long ago, prepares another box for his burial a small box containing human bonesA story containing angels Nice series this, what with the local folklore and indiosyncratic inhabitants.
3 She Walks These Hills Ballad, 3 3 The Rosewood Casket Ballad, 4 3 The Ballad of Frankie Silver Ballad, 5 This is a deeply resonant book about how secrets, silence, poverty, and war haunt two families and the whole Appalachian region It s also a continuation of the story of Nora Bonesteel, seer All that is wrapped up in an installment of a police procedural series Come for the detective story stay for the novel.
My first time to read Sharyn McCrumb, but a favorite author of my sisters, so I read The Rosewood Casket The story starts out with clarity and promise The prologue is intriguing enough to pull a reader in Ms McCrumb, very vividly, describes the wooded southern area and captures the people so well I truly felt as though I was in the mystic and beautiful place The story continues with an elderly man who lives alone and needs to be hospitalized His family, all sons and their wives, come from here and there to care for his needs and prepare for his death Then there is confusion Too much about each character and less about moving the story plot along The plot actually becomes intertwining of personalities, purpose, and history that I found the story hard to follow And throw in a devious real estate investor, a police officer, a neighbor and I m like, really where are we going Too many times The author is an excellent writer but this book was long and took me months to finish It ended up being the book I went to in between other books I think I ll try another of her books though because she does write so beautifully The Skye in June Randall Stargill Lies Dying On His Southern Appalachian Farm, And His Four Sons Have Come Home To Build Him A Coffin From The Cache Of Rosewood He Has Hoarded For The Special Purpose Meanwhile, Mountain Wisewoman Nora Bonesteel, Randall S Sweetheart Of Long Ago, Prepares Another Box For His Burial A Small Box Containing Human Bones An engaging, intriguing mix of history, mystery and magical realism set in Appalachia.
Meh.
In a nutshell, this book is about how what goes around comes around in the context of this novel, if you take someone s land, someone will eventually come and take your land or the land of your future offspring McCrumb uses the sad story of the Americas to illustrate a moral point, reaching back to Daniel Boone s days of European settlers stealing land from Native Americans though somehow he s revered, right and following this thread to 20th century America, where a family presumably offspring of the aforementioned sticky fingered settlers in Appalachian Tennessee is on the verge of having their farm stolen read bought for cheap by a greedy developer.
But there s to the story than this, isn t there Well, there is, but things become muddled Just what is the point here The moral lesson gets overshadowed by the story of an old, dying man who wants his four scattered and, frankly, jerkish sons to return to the family homestead and build his casket Each son has a significant other, and trying to keep up with the plot lines of the four grown men, the women in their lives, the dying man, two little girls one alive, one not , an old woman who has the gift of second sight, and the greedy land developer was a bit exhausting Oh, I forgot add to that list the old man and his daughter whose farm the developer wants to buy, Daniel Boone, and also a weird, out of place chapter from the point of view of Nancy Ward, an 18th 19th century Cherokee woman.
I see what McCrumb was going for, I really do I just would have preferred a simple telling of the story, and for that matter, maybe less of the story narrowing the focus instead of casting such a wide net To me, the most interesting plot line revolved around the ghost girl and the circumstances surrounding her life and death Come to think of it, why was that plot line even included It was a thread that ran through the entire book, but honestly, if it had been left out, I don t think it would have mattered.
I like spooky stories I like stories about Appalachia I like spooky stories about Appalachia, and I really wanted to like this book, but to me it was too disjointed There s an awful lot going on, and I never knew where to look, so to speak.
The Rosewood Casket was recommended to me, for my love of magical realism And I am very grateful for that recommendation This novel is set in Appalachian Tennessee, basically a foreign country to me, but McCrumb details both the culture and the landscape in a beautifully poetic way.
At its heart, this is not just a story of the Stargill family, but of the timeless transition of land tied creatures being forced to move, and indeed, of consequences It s the story of Daniel Boone, the Cherokee, indigenous species that have been shoved out by invasive species, and the development of farm land into McMansions and planned communities in the 1980 s But it s also the story of a collection of men and women that McCrumb paints as three dimensional, realistically flawed, and equally broken There is no sole protagonist or antagonist, though Clayte is most often the narrative voice it s truly an ensemble piece And one that plays with your expectations.
I highly recommend it for fans of magical realism, place centric fiction, historical influenced contemporary stories, those who enjoy the Appalachian culture, and adults who can relate to having dysfunctional families.



My first time to read Sharyn McCrumb, but a favorite author of my sisters, so I read The Rosewood Casket The story starts out with clarity and promise The prologue is intriguing enough to pull a reader in Ms McCrumb, very vividly, describes the wooded southern area and captures the people so well I truly felt as though I was in the mystic and beautiful place The story continues with an elderly man who lives alone and needs to be hospitalized His family, all sons and their wives, come from here and there to care for his needs and prepare for his death Then there is confusion Too much about each character and less about moving the story plot along The plot actually becomes intertwining of personalities, purpose, and history that I found the story hard to follow And throw in a devious real estate investor, a police officer, a neighbor and I m like, really where are we going Too many times The author is an excellent writer but this book was long and took me months to finish It ended up being the book I went to in between other books I think I ll try another of her books though because she does write so beautifully The Skye in June This is a deeply resonant book about how secrets, silence, poverty, and war haunt two families and the whole Appalachian region It s also a continuation of the story of Nora Bonesteel, seer All that is wrapped up in an installment of a police procedural series Come for the detective story stay for the novel.
An engaging, intriguing mix of history, mystery and magical realism set in Appalachia.
Meh.
In a nutshell, this book is about how what goes around comes around in the context of this novel, if you take someone s land, someone will eventually come and take your land or the land of your future offspring McCrumb uses the sad story of the Americas to illustrate a moral point, reaching back to Daniel Boone s days of European settlers stealing land from Native Americans though somehow he s revered, right and following this thread to 20th century America, where a family presumably offspring of the aforementioned sticky fingered settlers in Appalachian Tennessee is on the verge of having their farm stolen read bought for cheap by a greedy developer.
But there s to the story than this, isn t there Well, there is, but things become muddled Just what is the point here The moral lesson gets overshadowed by the story of an old, dying man who wants his four scattered and, frankly, jerkish sons to return to the family homestead and build his casket Each son has a significant other, and trying to keep up with the plot lines of the four grown men, the women in their lives, the dying man, two little girls one alive, one not , an old woman who has the gift of second sight, and the greedy land developer was a bit exhausting Oh, I forgot add to that list the old man and his daughter whose farm the developer wants to buy, Daniel Boone, and also a weird, out of place chapter from the point of view of Nancy Ward, an 18th 19th century Cherokee woman.
I see what McCrumb was going for, I really do I just would have preferred a simple telling of the story, and for that matter, maybe less of the story narrowing the focus instead of casting such a wide net To me, the most interesting plot line revolved around the ghost girl and the circumstances surrounding her life and death Come to think of it, why was that plot line even included It was a thread that ran through the entire book, but honestly, if it had been left out, I don t think it would have mattered.
I like spooky stories I like stories about Appalachia I like spooky stories about Appalachia, and I really wanted to like this book, but to me it was too disjointed There s an awful lot going on, and I never knew where to look, so to speak.
The Rosewood Casket was recommended to me, for my love of magical realism And I am very grateful for that recommendation This novel is set in Appalachian Tennessee, basically a foreign country to me, but McCrumb details both the culture and the landscape in a beautifully poetic way.
At its heart, this is not just a story of the Stargill family, but of the timeless transition of land tied creatures being forced to move, and indeed, of consequences It s the story of Daniel Boone, the Cherokee, indigenous species that have been shoved out by invasive species, and the development of farm land into McMansions and planned communities in the 1980 s But it s also the story of a collection of men and women that McCrumb paints as three dimensional, realistically flawed, and equally broken There is no sole protagonist or antagonist, though Clayte is most often the narrative voice it s truly an ensemble piece And one that plays with your expectations.
I highly recommend it for fans of magical realism, place centric fiction, historical influenced contemporary stories, those who enjoy the Appalachian culture, and adults who can relate to having dysfunctional families.